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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to have an endangerment finding, you have to have it based on science. what science would you use? she said, we would use the united nations, the inter governmental panel on climate change. it cooperate have been better -- it couldn't have been better timing. you talk about poetic justice, governor, it was a matter of days that clay mat gate came in. remember climate gate? it shows without a shadow of the doubt that the united nations has been cooking this science for a long period of time. >> it is amazing. when you bring these things to light a lot of americans are shocked to realize that you and the last few in the senate may be the last backstop before this administration takes us into some international treaty, international law, international agreement that none of us really would ever agree to. >> there are people i serve with who think it is not a good idea. what about our sovereignty? that's what it is all about. nonetheless, this did come from them. you have to keep in mind that -- you and i can both remember when the democrats' primary source of funding in washington was the
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered from the christmas eve heist are worth over $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square but folks in lisburn, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve the town drops yellow britches in honor of the yellow breeches creek. creative. >>> organizers in southern california applied the finishing touches to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go. you can watch that entire parade on nbc. >>> in nebraska, folks have a unique way of getting rid of the holiday, treat the fruitcake. the fruitcake filleting. people of all ages jumps at the chance, nice arm, to chuck the unwanted christmas gifts. >>> now for entertainment news. what's the new year without a psy update? he rang in the new year at times square telling jay gray he might be ready to move on from gangnam style. >> i cannot just, you know, stay here. i got to move forward. i'm working on a new thing. but if i keep doing this and
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. >>> talking this morning about the next economy. what the economy should and will look like after the great recession after we go back to full employment, if and whenever that ever happens. and how that affects workers. karl, the question on the table is can we have a prosperous economy and also in this increasingly flexible freelance situation? >> people like the security of an employment relationship and as workers have had less and less bargaining power in the market they've lost wage growth and employment growth. those are separate symptoms of the same thing. it's entirely possible to provide that with high wages without those things. those are two things that people like and as they have gotten worse and worse, the
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
was given the boot by security. >> academy motion pictures arts and sciences extended the oscar voting deadline to tomorrow over fears issues of the new electronic voting system we will learn who was nominated next week patti ann. >> top sports stories northern illinois makes the first trip to the bowl championship series but it was anything but memorable. it was no match for the orange bowl. the huskies lost 31-10. they went on to beat the badgers 20-14. stanford's first rose bowl victory in 40 years. >>> angie reed may not be without a team for too long. they contacted the former coach and topic to coach the team. espn reports he could accept the job by the end of the week. >>> all things must come to an end including the clipper's 17 game winning streak. the nuggets won it was the longest streak since 2008 and franchise record for the clippers. >> the time 42 after the hour. still to come they asked members to pay more money but it turns out one teacher's union wanted to raise dues to pay for parties. we always hear being fat can kill you but could holding on to just a few extra pou
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
during a recent bout with the stomach flu. nbc's chief science and health correspondent bob bazell is at new york presbyterian hospital where secretary clinton is being treated. bob, i know this is a story we're all keeping a very close eye on. what's the latest? we know she has a blood clot that came from -- they say from the concussion. we know it's being treated with anti-coagulant drugs. a lot of doctors are puzzled by that series of events because most blood clots that come from a concussion would be in the brain, and they would not be treated with anti-coagulamt drugs. we don't know where it is or what her condition is. there's been no report about what her health status is other than she's under observation for these two days. there's a lot of puzzles here. a lot of people are hoping for the best, but clearly somebody doesn't come into the hospital over -- in the holiday berd just for a routine check-up, so something is going on. we hope to hear more, and we hope to see that she gets out of here in good shape pretty soon. we really -- i wish i had more informati information.
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science monitor." he has this regular meeting with politically important people. they raise the issue of the rumors of bills -- bill's philandering. hillary said, i wanted to know that we have had troubles in our married lives, but we love each other, we believe in each other, and i love my husband, and we will stick together for the rest of our lives. there were blown away. what they do not know, and what neither of the clintons know, is that nine months later when a bill is soaring in the polls, at that very moment, flowers says she has had a 12-year love affair with bill clinton. >> bill chase and how the clinton's relationship benefit in the political ambitions. that is tonight at 10:00 eastern. that continues squadder days of nonfiction authors on booktv. -- four days of nonfiction authors on booktv. "washington journal" continues. host: we're back with george zornick. what you think of this deal was reached in the senate last night? caller: is a crazy time we live in. what happened last night is absent of meaning without the or thent's signature house. you had the sequester go i
rocket science. stop spending money we don't have. cut back on what we do spend and stop sending money to our enemies. now, there's a novel idea. paul from beaumont, said this. we don't have a revenue problem. instead, it's been a spending problem and it's been a spending problem for a long time. larry said, if i'm ute of cash i stop -- if i'm out of cash, i stop spending. perhaps congress should do the same what i do in my house. when i don't have enough money i stop spending. congress has a printing press backed by the chinese. ashley says, spending must be stopped. just taking more from americans is not good. if my taxes aren't affected, my employers are. what will happen to me in the long run? i guess i'm going to find out. yes, you are going to find out here on new year's eve. i am fed up on not agreeing to a budget and this out-of-control action has got to stop. renee from crosby, texas, said this. please demand that spending be cut, fraud, waste and abuse be stopped in government spending and address this before anybody thinks about raising taxes on hardworking americans. mr. sp
because, of course, this is science hour, of course, but i was just reading up on this, but, you know, in rats, even in dogs and other animals, the calorie-restricted diets do increase the life span by one-third. they did a study on primates. it doesn't seem to actually translate to primates. therefore, people are assuming it doesn't translate to humans. >> just read this story because you want to have it in context. it does not mean you eat bgarbae that's out there. >> obviously you have to eat right. the book you're writing, there's some people that actually eat well are never hungry. maybe slightly overweight, but they eat healthy. those people are fine. >> yeah. and that's a hard diet to accomplish in the food environment that we live in, which is what i'm writing about. >> not if you wrap it all with bacon which is what i do. >> you have a resolution. >> what is the resolution? >> he's going to lose weight. he's going to get in really good shape. >> i think i'm looking pretty good right now. >> right. >> you look slightly overweight. >> i'm doing all right. >>> with us now, chief
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> when we come back, we're going to talk more about frustrations in washington reaching a boiling point. up next, we'll make sure rick santelli's blood pressure is in an acceptable range. plus the mood from the traders in the futures pit. then the latest on the fiscal cliff negotiations from republican senator bob corker. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box," everyone. let's take a look at a few stocks that might be on the move. bristol-myers squibb has gotten fda approval for its anti-clotting drug eliquis. it's designed to prevent clot
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)